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Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Maternal employment and overweight children found in the catalog.

Maternal employment and overweight children

Anderson, Patricia M.

Maternal employment and overweight children

by Anderson, Patricia M.

  • 276 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Working mothers -- United States.,
  • Overweight children -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPatricia M. Anderson, Kristin F. Butcher, Phillip B. Levine.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 8770, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 8770.
    ContributionsButcher, Kristin F., Levine, Phillip B., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination28, [13] p. ;
    Number of Pages28
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22432614M

    Maternal employment and overweight children. @article{AndersonMaternalEA, title={Maternal employment and overweight children.}, author={Patricia M. Anderson and Kristin F. Butcher and Phillip B Levine}, journal={Journal of health economics}, year={}, volume={22 3}, pages={ } }. between maternal working hours and early childhood overweight in Japan. Given the diversified forms of employment (e.g., increasing contract workers), we also aimed to investigate the effects of maternal work-ing hours, taking account of the form of maternal employment. Materials and Methods Study design and participants.

    Maternal employment, time use, and overweight children: A series of implications of legal marijuana sales Rahi Abouk, William Paterson University Scott Adams, University of . Maternal Employment and Childcare Arrangements Section 3, Article 5 - Without a doubt, the physical, cognitive, social and spiritual developmental from infancy to two years of age are momentous.

    Maternal employment might reduce time spent with children, which could in turn increase childhood obesity. Maternal employment might lead to unhealthier diets and sedentary behavior among children, thereby increasing childhood obesity. Maternal employment could increase childhood obesity if external care is of lower quality.   This paper investigates the channels through which maternal employment affects childhood obesity. We use time diaries and interview responses from the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics which combines information on children’s time allocation, children’s BMI, and mother’s labor force participation. We find some evidence that supervision and Cited by:


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Maternal employment and overweight children by Anderson, Patricia M. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Journal of Health Economics 22 () – Maternal employment and overweight children Patricia M. Andersona,d, Kristin F. Butcherb, Phillip B. Levinec,d,∗ a Department of Economics, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NHUSA b Research Department, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, S. LaSalle Street, Chicago, ILUSA c Department of Economics, Wellesley.

Downloadable. This paper investigates whether children are more or less likely to be overweight if their mothers work.

The prevalence of both overweight children and working mothers has risen dramatically over the past few decades, although these parallel trends may be coincidental. The goal of this paper is to help determine whether a causal relationship exists between maternal employment and.

The prevalence of both overweight children and working mothers has risen dramatically over the past few decades, although these parallel trends may be coincidental. The goal of this paper is to help determine whether a causal relationship exists between maternal employment and childhood overweight.

This paper seeks to determine whether a causal relationship exists between maternal employment and childhood weight problems.

We use matched mother–child data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and employ econometric techniques to control for observable and unobservable differences across individuals and families that may influence both children’s weight and their Cited by: This paper seeks to determine whether a causal relationship exists between maternal employment and childhood overweight.

We use matched mother/child data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and employ econometric techniques to control for observable and unobservable differences across individuals and families that may influence both children's weight and their mothers' work patterns.

Abstract. This paper seeks to determine whether a causal relationship exists between maternal employment and childhood overweight.

We use matched mother/child data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and employ econometric techniques to control for observable and unobservable differences across individuals and families that may influence both children's weight Cited by: children in these families. Finally, while our results indicate that maternal employment has a significant impact on children’s overweight for some groups, those who would blame maternal employment for the deterioration in children’s health overall need to look elsewhere for the whole story.

Recent literature has shown consistent evidence of a positive relationship between maternal employment and children's overweight status. These studies largely use average weekly work hours over the child's life to measure employment.

This paper specifically aims at exploring the importance of the timing of by: In Table 3, we investigate whether the timing of maternal employment makes a difference for children’s overweight status.

Table 3 presents two sets of analyses. First, it separates the sample into children age 3–5 and those age 6–Cited by: Background: Maternal employment may affect child care styles and contribute to the increasing prevalence of overweight children.

We explored the potential risk factors for becoming overweight. Investigating the relationship between maternal employment and overweight children in the US, Anderson et al. (), the most cited study in this field, and Ruhm () find that the greater the intensity of the mother’s work schedule over the child’s life, the.

Recent literature has shown consistent evidence of a positive relationship between maternal employment and children's overweight status. These studies largely use average weekly work hours.

Recent literature has shown consistent evidence of a positive relationship between maternal employment and children’s excess body weight.

These studies have mainly focused on the effect of average weekly work hours over the child’s life on its overweight or obesity by: This paper seeks to determine whether a causal relationship exists between maternal employment and childhood overweight. We use matched mother/child data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and employ econometric techniques to control for observable and unobservable differences across individuals and families that may influence both children’s weight and their mothers’ work.

J Health Econ. May;22(3) Maternal employment and overweight children. Anderson PM(1), Butcher KF, Levine PB. Author information: (1)Department of Economics, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NHUSA. [email protected] This paper seeks to determine whether a causal relationship exists between maternal employment and childhood weight by: Maternal employment and overweight children.

Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Patricia M Anderson; Kristin F Butcher; Phillip B Levine; National Bureau of Economic Research.

Any maternal employment after the child's birth was associated with early childhood overweight (odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)]; Cited by: CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): The Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO) is a leading research centre, combining expertise in economics, geography and law.

Our objective is to study the intersection between the public and private sectors of the economy, and in particular to understand the right way to organise and deliver public services. 3 mothers in employment. Independent risk factors for early childhood overweight were consistent with the published literature.

Conclusions: Long hours of maternal employment rather than lack of money may impede young children’s access to healthy foods and physical activity. Get this from a library. Maternal employment and overweight children. [Patricia M Anderson; Kristin F Butcher; Phillip B Levine; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Abstract: This paper investigates whether children are more or less likely to be overweight if their mothers work.

The prevalence of both overweight children and working mothers has risen. Maternal employment and overweight children. Patricia Anderson, Kristin Butcher and Phillip Levine. Journal of Health Economics,vol. 22, issue 3, Date: References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc Citations: View citations in EconPapers () Track citations by RSS feed Downloads: (external link) Cited by: Maternal employment, time use, and overweight children: A series of implications of legal marijuana sales Rahi Abouk Department of Economics, Finance and Global Business William Paterson University Scott Adams Department of Economics University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee November Recent literature has shown consistent evidence of a positive relationship between maternal employment and children’s excess body weight.

These studies have mainly focused on the effect of average weekly work hours over the child’s life on its overweight or obesity status. This paper attempts to explore whether the timing of maternal employment with respect to the child’s age is an.